I didn't capture the full size picture of Heavenly Light, but I found this beautifully carved wall stone outside of it.

Bang Pa-In Summer Palace! Euro-style Palace in Northern Bangkok!

Day 2 – July 28, 2011

I made the decision to visit Bang Pa-In and Ayutthaya not without any hesitation. What I had in mind was : how on earth am I going to get there? From what I read in wikitravel.org, there isn’t any easy choice on how to get there. But when I made up my mind to go there, I decided to get there by train to Bang Pa-In first and continue to Ayutthaya.

More or less, the plan was like this:

  • Go to Hua Lamphong Railway Station to get to Bang Pa-In Station
  • From that station, find songthaew to get to Bang Pa-In Summer Palace
  • Find my way to Wat Niwet near Bang Pa-In Summer Palace
  • Continue the trip to Ayutthaya (I didn’t have any idea on how to get there)
  • Visit Wat Mahathat and Wat Ratchaburana
  • Find the minivan that will get me to Victory Monument
  • Go to Ma Boon Krong with BTS
  • Go back to hostel

I woke up at 4.30 AM and headed out to Hua Lamphong Railway Station at 5.30 AM. I took a cab to get there. At first, I thought it would be at least 100 Baht, but turned out it costs 55 Baht for a cab fare from Khao San Road.
Arriving at Hua Lamphong, I hurriedly looked for any information center I could find there. And yes! I found it. I asked the officer and she nicely gave me some instructions on how to get there, how much it costs, where to buy the ticket and information pamphlet of train schedule. The ticket to Bang Pa-In costs 20 Baht.
The train will be leaving for Bang Pa-In at 7.00 AM. The trip will take approximately 1.5-hours. However, there was a fifteen-minute late that morning. All in all, I had fun taking the train to Bang Pa-In. I met a lot of good people on my way there🙂
I was halfway to Bang Pa-In Station at that moment.
Arriving at Bang Pa-In Station, I met a French couple who shared a songthaew (20 Baht) with me to get to Bang Pa-In Palace. And Ho Hem Monthian Thewarat was the first photo object I found here. It is a small stone structure in the form of Khmer-style prasat (residence of a king or god with a corncob-shaped structure) built by King Chulalongkorn in 1880. Well, it's certainly not a palace, it's a very small structure actually.
Withun Thasana Hall was constructed in the form of a tower between Utthayan Phumisathian and Wehat Chamrun. It is a three-storey building having a spirit staircase leading to the top floor hall. Since it was packed with kids that day, I decided not to go up this tower.
This Thai-style pavilion in the middle of a pond was built by King Chulalongkorn (Rama V). It now houses a statue of him.
I don't know what it's called. But from what I read, it's the Gatehouse.
Phra Thinang Uthayan Phumisathian was the favourite residence of King Chulalongkorn when he stayed at Bang Pa-In Palace. It is, of course, closed for public, but seeing it from outside, I can guess what kind of luxury it keeps inside.
It looks like a gate, but I really don't know what it is for and its name. But, it is a good looking gate.
The water tank, disguised as a crenelated Neo-Gothic tower, is only part of the original structure still in existence.
One of the carvings inside Heavenly Light (Wehart Chamrun). Built by the Chinese Chamber of Commerce in 1889, this opulent Chinese-style palace is also another standout, full of red, gold, dark woods and inlaid mother of pearl.
I was warned by wikitravel.org not to miss the stupendous dragon sculpture inside carved from camel bone. I guess this is it.
I didn't capture the full size picture of Heavenly Light, but I found this beautifully carved wall stone outside of it.
To complete the Versaillesque garden, along the bridge connecting places inside Bang Pa-In Summer Palace, several European style statues are erected.
Another angle of those statues mentioned above. They really make this palace looks like it isn't located in Thailand.
In 1881, Queen Sunanda Kumariratana and her only daughter Princess Karnabhorn Bejraratana were on their way to the Bang Pa-In Palace when the royal barge carrying them capsized. According to Thai law at the time, touching a royal was punishable by death, so onlookers looked on helplessly as they drowned - and were instructed to do so by a guardian on another boat. It was an extremely ironic and sad story, the death caused by the law itself.

Well, Bang Pa-In Summer Palace, in my opinion, is very photogenic. You’ll have a lot of things to look and find out around this complex.

And from here, I was looking for my way to Wat Niwet, a gothic-church-look-alike-Buddhist-temple. I asked several other tourists I met, but none of them was familiar with Wat Niwet. Until I finally met a woman (looked like she is a guide) who told me how to get to Wat Niwet.

Oh yeah, the entrance fee to Bang Pa-In Palace is 100 Baht. I guess it is fair enough judging for what we can see and learn from this place. If you want to find out more about Bang Pa-In Summer Palace, you can open this, this, and this. Information stated in this post is extracted from those sites.

For my next post, I will post about Wat Niwet and how to get to Ayutthaya. So, stick around to find out more about the Day 2 of my journey in Thailand.

Au revoir!

10 thoughts on “Bang Pa-In Summer Palace! Euro-style Palace in Northern Bangkok!

    1. Hello there.

      You can go to bang pa in train station first and then take the train to Bangkok. I asked local’s help to get me to bang pa in train station at that time, one of them took me ther with motorbike. Hope this helps.

  1. It’s appropriate time to make some plans for the future and it’s time to be happy.

    I have learn this post and if I may just
    I want to suggest you some fascinating issues or
    advice. Perhaps you can write subsequent articles regarding this article.

    I want to learn more issues about it!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s